About NSIS:

NSIS (Nullsoft Scriptable Install System) is a professional open source system to create Windows installers. You can download NSIS from the main website HERE.

The Code Explained:

You will want to create a new text file with the nsi extension. The follwing is a breakdown of the script.

Here we want to include code to check if we are on x64 or x32
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!include "x64.nsh"
!include "LogicLib.nsh"
Here we want to name our script and exe file
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Name PythonInstaller
OutFile PythonInstaller
Lets setup the stype and permission level needed
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XPStyle on
RequestExecutionLevel admin
ShowInstDetails show
Lets define our Section
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Section "Install Python 2.7.6"
    InitPluginsDir
    IfFileExists C:\python27\python.exe WeAreGood WeAreBad
    WeAreGood:
        DetailPrint "Already Installed: Skipping Python..."
        Goto Finished
    WeAreBad:
      ${If} ${RunningX64}
          NSISdl::download "http://legacy.python.org/ftp/python/2.7.6/python-2.7.6.amd64.msi" $PLUGINSDIR\python.msi
      ${Else}
          NSISdl::download "http://legacy.python.org/ftp/python/2.7.6/python-2.7.6.msi" $PLUGINSDIR\python.msi
      ${EndIf}
      DetailPrint "Installing Python"
      nsExec::ExecToLog 'msiexec /i "$PLUGINSDIR\python.msi" /passive /quiet /norestart TARGETDIR=C:\Python27'
      Pop $0
      ${If} $0 != 0
          About "Failed to install Python: $0"
      ${EndIf}
    Finished:
SectionEnd

Compiling the nsi:

All that is left is to right click on the file and choose “Compile NSIS Script”

The Results:

You now have a script that will check if Python is install, if not it will download and then do a silent install.

Your Welcome!

The Book:

Unmasking the Social Engineer was written by Christopher Hadnagy at social-engineer.com. He takes the research from Paul Ekman, PH.D. and applies it to the human element of security. You can find it on Amazon in both Kindle and Paperback versions HERE.

The Good:

The book covers a wide array of topics including nonverbal communications, decoding body language, deciphering the science behind it all and then how to put it all together. Hadnagy seems to have taken the extra efforts to make sure that everything in the book is grounded in hard science (and it shows). Each chapter is sprinkled with real life examples of the topics with what worked and what failed on that engagement. The information is not just about body language and how to decode it; it is applied directly to the art of social engineering!

The Bad:

I have read most of the books that were referenced in this book, which made some of the underlining science a bit boring and mostly review. This isn’t really bad; perhaps more of a heads up than anything else.

Summary:

This book is written in such a way that it’s an easy read from end to end as well as a great reference book on the subject. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in social engineering. This is a must read for anyone starting out to the seasoned pros.

ENJOY!

Step 1: Install the needed packages

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sudo apt-get -y install libqt4-dev libboost1.48-all-dev subversion

Step 2: Building edb-debugger

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svn checkout http://edb-debugger.googlecode.com/svn/trunk edb-debugger
cd edb-debugger
qmake
make
sudo make install

Step 3: Locate edb

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whereis edb

Step 4: Create home directory

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cd ~
mkdir .edb

Step 5: Setting up directories

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sudo edb

Once the program has launched, goto Directories under Preferences.

  • Set Symbol Directory: /home/$USER/.edb
  • Plugin Directory: /lib64/edb/ (Found in step 3)
  • Session Directory: /home/$USER/.edb

Step 6: Close and then restart edb

Happy debugging!

I’ve been looking for a micro project to get some use out of my Shapeoko. What’s more fun then a 5.25 floppy disk coaster?

I started by taking measurements from a real 5.25 disk (yes, I have some sitting around). Next, I modeled it with FreeCAD and then imported it into HeeksCAD. After about 45 minutes of messing with sketches, pockets, and profiles I had my G-code. 30 minutes later i had a nice coaster for my drinks.

This is a very small inconspicuous handcuff key I found in one of my RSS feeds. I’m not sure why, but I had to check them out. I like the small footprint and it clips nicely on a belt loop or on the webbing of my daily carry bag. I don’t like that it’s made of stainless steel; it’s something that you could easily forget about while going through a metal detector.

You can find these lovely things over at TIHK’s website www.tihk.co.